Time-is-Money2_reneequim.com_This post is for those with a substantial Business Relationship Management (BRM) role — i.e., at least 50% of their job is BRM.

I am part way though a research project that is examining where BRMs are spending their time, and where they think they should be spending it. (If you would like to be part of this research, and receive a free copy of the research report “BRM Time Allocation Patterns and Ways to Improve Them” please respond to the survey. The survey will stay open until October 1, 2014.)

I will be reviewing the research in an upcoming free webinar entitled, “A Day in the Life of an Effective Business Relationship Manager” to be held on October 3, at 11am ET. For details, please click here.

Preliminary Results – BRMs Want to Change Their Time Allocation!

Of all roles, the BRM seems to be most prone to being dragged into directions that are not seen to be valuable. There are several reasons for this:

  1. “Urgency” always seems to trump “valuable.” If you have not contracted with your key stakeholders around how the role can and should work in order to deliver the highest business value, then your day will be largely spent dealing with operational and largely tactical issues. You might feel like a hero at the end of the week, but you business partners and key IT stakeholders will likely not see you that way.
  2. Without explicit outcomes defined, any activity seems worthwhile. We easily confuse “busyness” with “effectiveness.”  In the heat of the moment, these things can feel the same — but they are not!
  3. Under stress, we fall back on our core competencies. If we were successful project managers before we were BRM’s, getting “dragged into” project management activities is an easy trap to fall into. I wish I’d had $10 for each BRM that has told me, “I don’t have time to be strategic — the tactical demands consume all my effort and energy!” Deeper assessment and reflection usually reveals that the lack of time to be strategic is self-inflicted — worn as a ‘badge of courage’ to display how important one is to ‘keeping the lights on and the trains running on time!’
  4. BRMs sometimes feel compelled to ‘collude with dysfunctional behavior.’ For example, Service Management might be poorly implemented, with a result that services are not clearly defined, service levels are erratic, and there is insufficient transparency into how the services work and the customer experience those services create. Rather than act as change agents to upgrade Service Management discipline, the BRM steps in to ‘mask’ the poor customer experience, or respond to service failures. This ‘enabling’ behavior might feel good to the BRM, but tends to make things worse over the longer term — and limits the time available for the BRM to take on the more valuable activities.

So, What Can BRMs Do About Changing their Time Allocation?

The first thing they must do is to classify and be aware of where there time is going, and compare that with where they and their key stakeholders believe the time should be going. This will be the key focus for my “A Day in the Life of an Effective Business Relationship Manager” webinar to be held on October 3, at 11am ET (for details, please click here) so I’ll leave this as a teaser for now.

Calls To Action

  1. Please participate in the research, and get yourself on a track to higher performance effectiveness — respond to the survey
  2. Please join me for the webinar — and be part of the change you would like to see — sign up for the webinar

 

Image courtesy of At Your Service Concierge