synchronicity1

The more I teach, the more I learn!  Last week I wrote about the boxing metaphor for Business Relationship Management–a metaphor that surfaced during a recent onsite Business Relationship Management Professional® (BRMP®) certification course I was teaching. This week, a new and surprising metaphor surfaced in my online version of the course–that of Synchronicity Coach.

Learning Through Metaphors

Early in the BRMP course, I ask participants what metaphors come to mind for them when they think about the Business Relationship Manager role, and this week one of the participants offered “Synchronicity Coach.” I asked him to say more about his metaphor, and he said:

Both business and IT need to constantly adapt to changes in the information and Information Technology landscape.  The natural tendency is to adapt over independent paths, which is not healthy. The BRM role exists to bring these independent adaption paths into synchronicity.

I thought this was a very astute perspective. I’ve blogged in the past about the notion of “Business-IT Convergence”–going well beyond the elusive “Alignment” goal (which always feels reactive) to something more proactive, that recognizes that:

  1. Business executives and managers are becoming ever more IT literate.
  2. Information and IT are becoming every more ‘consumerized.’
  3. The role of the IT organization is shifting from the ‘doers’ to the ‘enablers’ and ‘coaches’.

Synchronicity

Wikipedia defines Synchronicity as:

The occurrence of two or more events that appear to be meaningfully related but not causally related. Synchronicity holds that such events are “meaningful coincidences”. The concept of synchronicity was first defined by Carl Jung, a Swiss psychiatrist, in the 1920s. During his career, Jung furnished several slightly different definitions of it. Jung variously defined synchronicity as an “acausal connecting (togetherness) principle,” “meaningful coincidence,” and “acausal parallelism.”

Certainly, business is evolving in its relationship to information and IT, and the IT organization (or, more correctly, the IT Operating Model) is evolving in its relationship to Information Technology and the enterprises and business units it supports. So, I think that what my participant was referring to the BRM as a coach in fostering Business-IT Convergence:

  • Helping the business harvest more value from information and IT.
  • Helping the IT organization be more responsive to, and anticipate the needs of the business units/enterprise they support.
  • Increasing the transparency of IT to the business and business to IT–fostering porous boundaries that allow Business-IT Convergence to be a natural evolutionary response to Cloud Computing, Consumerization of IT, “Big data” and so on.

The best way to learn is to teach!