5-dysfunctions-of-a-trial-team-fix-dysfunctional-litigationI’m often consulted when a Business Relationship Management (BRM) team is experiencing an identity crisis regarding any or all of its:

  • Mission
  • Vision
  • Roles
  • Metrics
  • Value proposition

All That Hard Work Might Be Misguided!

Typically, the BRM team is working very hard to act as a valued bridge between an internal (and sometimes, external) provider, most often an IT organization and their Business Partners. Unfortunately, dysfunctionality in the IT organization (frequently, one of the main reasons the BRM role was established in the first place) is inadvertently ‘masked’ by the BRM in a noble attempt to please their Business Partners. This happens when they ‘pick up the pieces’ when processes fail or when things fall through the cracks, or even when they step in by way of anticipating a process, project or service deficiency.

Adding Cost – But Not Adding Value

These “pick up the pieces” and “gap filling” activities might feel valuable (“Well, I prevented a fire!” or, “I was able to mollify my Business Partner when we blew the agreed service levels!”) but in reality they add cost, not value:

  1. Expensive people (BRMs) are spending valuable time compensating for broken processes or poor service and/or project management. Those broken processes and poorly managed services and projects cost money to run, especially when they don’t run well. All the BRM is doing is adding more cost (interventions) and masking the defects.
  2. By masking the defects, the broken processes and poorly managed services and projects perpetuate — incurring not only the costs of those processes and services, but also incurring the costs of poor quality, rework and delays.
  3. By stepping into essentially tactical activities, the Business Partner sees the BRM as a tactical resource and is less likely to engage them in potentially high-value producing activities such as demand shaping, business problem solving and strategy formulation.

Where Does the BRM’s Time Go?

BRM Time Pie 1

Typical BRM Time Allocation

One of the exercises I often ask my consulting clients to go through is to identify a list of 8 to 10 major activities they engage in, and then keep a log of where their time goes, for a couple of weeks or a month. The chart above is a simplified example of what I often see in a relatively mature IT organization.  (In a less mature organization, the numbers are far less attractive!) Some things to note:

  • Only 10% of the BRM’s time is devoted to Demand Shaping (stimulating ideas and opportunities for high business value demand, while suppressing, deflecting or redirecting requests that will deliver little to no net business value). This can be one of the most valuable BRM activities, but at 4 hours per week, is unlikely to yield significant results.
  • At least 15% of the BRM’s time is devoted to Service Management. This should be the focus of the Service Management group — not the BRM. While Service Management is critically important (necessary ‘table stakes’ for building trust and respect between the business partner and their IT organization) is is not where BRM’s should be spending so much of their time.  Not only is this a misuse of BRM time, but it positions the BRM in a non-strategic role — significantly reducing the chances that they will be “invited to the strategy table” where they have a real and important opportunity to influence business value.
  • 15% of the BRM’s time is on communication (formally communicating about project status, service status, etc.) 6 hours per week is a lot of time spent on this types of communication and is often a symptom of IT dysfunctionality. If processes are not well defined and continuously improving, and if roles are not clearly defined with clear responsibilities and accountabilities, the need for ‘communication’ to compensate for this dysfunctionality blossoms (dealing with the aftermath of service lapses, explaining rework and schedule slippages, etc.)

Where Does Your BRM’s Time Go?

Ignoring the specifics of the illustration above, think for a minute about the general principles I’m surfacing:

  1. Where are you spending your time? Have you performed the analysis?  What 8 to 10 major activities do you engage in?
  2. How should you be spending your time? Which activities have the potential to create the most business value?
  3. On which activities are you spending time that is actually masking problems elsewhere? Are you helping solve those problems, or are you simply compensating for them?

Note: My next on-line BRMP Certification course is being held across 3 Tuesdays—September 2, 9 and 16 . For details, please click here.

Image courtesy of A2L Consulting